The Decision On The Najib Case

Justice has been done today with the conviction of Dato’ Sri Najib Razak in the SRC International case involving all 7 charges of abuse of power, criminal breach of trust and money laundering.

This proves that the years-long struggle to expose and bring to justice the abuses of the 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) scandal by so many patriotic Malaysians has finally been vindicated.

There should be no longer any doubt that a grievous wrong was done to Malaysia via the 1MDB scandal. The rakyat can now judge for themselves after years of attempts at denial and obfuscation not just by Najib but by his enablers.

It is crucial that the various investigations, court cases and efforts to recover stolen funds in relation to 1MDB must continue without delay, fear or favour.

Every cent that was stolen must be returned and all guilty parties brought to justice.

While today’s court case is a welcome development, it is just the beginning and not an end in the cause to bring this sordid saga to an end.

NIK NAZMI NIK AHMAD
KEADILAN CHIEF ORGANISING SECRETARY
SETIAWANGSA MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT

All Parties Have Stated Their Positions , Focus Should Be On The Rakyat

The Opposition should not be focused on positions but on defending the interests of the rakyat in these difficult times.

We should not be trying to relitigate the past but focused on the future. Still, it cannot be denied that Pakatan Harapan’s victory in the 2018 General Elections was not the sole work of any one individual or party.

It was a collective effort, borne by the sacrifices of many, which came to fruition because of the support of the people of Malaysia.

The rakyat backed us because of our Buku Harapan manifesto as well as our pledge that a transition of power would take place. That is what defeated UMNO-Barisan Nasional. That is why KEADILAN won 47 seats, DAP 42, BERSATU 13, AMANAH 11 and our ally WARISAN 8 in that election.

Again, we should not be preoccupied with questions about who our next Prime Ministerial candidate should be. Each party, including Pakatan Harapan has stated its position. The Leader of the Opposition in Parliament has also been named. These facts should be respected.

The crucial thing is for the parties in Opposition to concentrate on working to hold the government accountable for its actions as well as to ensure that there are wise policies in place to facilitate an economic recovery.

We were sent to Parliament to make sure that Malaysians have the jobs, education, aid and opportunities they deserve.

NIK NAZMI NIK AHMAD
KEADILAN ORGANISING SECRETARY
SETIAWANGSA MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT

Thoughts On Opportunities And Challenges For Kuala Lumpur 2020

Most of the key issues in KL are all related to the economy and development. The level of development and per capita income in the city can be said to be almost, or on par with developed countries.

However, the issues stem from the fact that the B40 in KL are often overlooked because of their higher income than their counterparts from rural areas and even other towns, while the cost of living in KL is not taken into account.

With regards, to income disparity, there is indeed no easy short-term solution.

The increase in minimum wage is positive. In fact, KL should be the pioneer for a living wage that was proposed by Bank Negara. In addition, programs for interventions in welfare, education and health should be expanded.

There is a lot to be done to improve the environment in PPRs, and I believe it is important to focus on children.

That is why I have innovated on what I learned with the Mentari Project in PJ with the Tunas Mentari football project in PPR Air Panas and the Reading Bus Program in AU3.

In the long term, I believe we should have some form of local council elections. But we must acknowledge there still exists long-held fears of racial dominance, dating to the days of 1960s, which was borne through local council elections as well.

The government should conduct a study on how to implement a system that is inclusive and will dispel any fears. Even if we cannot implement in nationwide, the democratic deficit justifies KL to have an elected local government.

KL is a city with a lot of potential, and really the sky’s the limit. However, we need to move beyond the nitty-gritty issues.

We need to focus on public transport, as it is crucial for the city. There has been a lot of work done by Prasarana, FT Ministry and DBKL in improving this.

Previously the free GoKL bus service was only utilised by tourists and foreigners due to its routes which mainly serves the downtown area of the city.

Now, the expanded and new routes go through residential areas and connect with existing LRT/MRT lines. We should look at restarting MRT3, whether using the original route or an improved route.

Ultimately, the KL City Plan must be viewed holistically for a sustainable development of the city. We can allow development, but work harder in providing new PPR areas to ensure the city remains inclusive.

At the same time, the character of KL must be preserved whether it is about the city’s heritage or green areas.

The Government Should Look Into The Living Wage Recommended By Bank Negara

Yesterday I explained why the concerns of the employers who are not satisfied by the new RM1,200 minimum wage in the cities are baseless.

But the government should also consider the living wage that was proposed by Bank Negara in line with developed economies across the world.

I have raised this in Parliament before. The fact is that the minimum wage and living wage are different.

The minimum wage, which is the statutory minimum, of RM1,200 is far lower than the living wage. The living wage is not mandatory in nature, but can be introduced through incentives and encouragements.

According to the 2017 Bank Negara Annual Report, the living wage for an individual in Kuala Lumpur was RM2,700, while a household with two children would require RM 6,500.

The living wage goes beyond securing necessities such as food and shelter, but also affords social participation and financial security.

In 2016, nearly 50% of working adults in Kuala Lumpur earned less than RM2,500 per month, and up to 27% of households earned below the estimated living wage.

IDEAS Malaysia a think-tank known for its free market ideas that are frequently referred by major corporations, have also proposed a living wage policy through tax credits.

If IDEAS itself has proposed this, it is clear that the concept that Malaysians need higher wages should no longer be controversial, but accepted in order to drive our economy forward.

The government should look at the relevant sectors as well as incentives in order to introduce a living wage in stages through consultation with government agencies, employers and employees.

NIK NAZMI NIK AHMAD
KEADILAN Chief Organising Secretary
KEADILAN Central Leadership Council Member
Setiawangsa Member of Parliament

The People Need The RM1,200 Minimum Wage In 57 Urban Areas

Recently there have been reports that employers are unhappy with the recent increase in the minimum wage to RM 1,200 per month in 57 urban areas across the country.

Increasing the minimum wage to RM 1,500 per month (gradually over a 5-year period) is one of the promises in Pakatan Harapan’s manifesto. Claims that this move will only benefit foreign workers are untrue, there are many Malaysians that earn a minimum wage.

In fact, retaining the minimum wage at the current wage makes it unattractive for Malaysians, and contributes to the flow of our ringgit overseas by foreign workers.

Unlike many other economies, the ratio of corporate profit to GDP in Malaysia is still high. For every RM1 generated in 2016, 35.3 sen was paid to the employee and 59.5 sen went to corporate earnings, while 5 sen was given to the government in the form of taxes.

In the past few years, our economic growth was driven by consumer spending but this was largely funded by debt. Our total household debt has reached a staggering RM1.18 trillion at a rate of 82.2% of GDP.

We are past the days of economic growth being driven from low wages. If we are to evolve into a high-income nation, economic growth cannot only come from increased profit .

Increasing wages will increase productivity, and has a bigger multiplier effect on the country’s GDP. Workers earning minimum wages tend to spend most of their earnings that will benefit the economy as a whole.

NIK NAZMI NIK AHMAD
KEADILAN Chief Organising Secretary
KEADILAN Central Leadership Council Member
Setiawangsa Member of Parliament